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    San rock engravings

    ISBN: 9781770078154
    The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water.
    R59,00
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    The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water. Their engravings most commonly (though not always) depict animals such as eland, quagga or elephant, and reflect, in fascinating and unusual ways, the relationship of the San to the harsh environment of the Karoo. San Rock Engravings explores the visual legacy of these ancient artists, the signs they left on the land and the meanings that could be attached to them.
    The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water. Their engravings most commonly (though not always) depict animals such as eland, quagga or elephant, and reflect, in fascinating and unusual ways, the relationship of the San to the harsh environment of the Karoo. San Rock Engravings explores the visual legacy of these ancient artists, the signs they left on the land and the meanings that could be attached to them.
    Products specifications
    Sub-Title Marking the Karoo landscape
    Contributor Parkington, John; Rusch, Neil
    Language English
    Format hardback (slipcased)
    Height 180.0
    Width 200.0
    Publisher Struik Nature
    Publication Date 2010-06-01
    Short Description The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water.
    Short Description The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water.
    Full Description The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water. Their engravings most commonly (though not always) depict animals such as eland, quagga or elephant, and reflect, in fascinating and unusual ways, the relationship of the San to the harsh environment of the Karoo. San Rock Engravings explores the visual legacy of these ancient artists, the signs they left on the land and the meanings that could be attached to them.
    Full Description The vast spaces of the Karoo abound with images pecked, incised or engraved onto rock surfaces. These landscape markings, generally known simply as 'rock engravings', were created in the pre-colonial period by San hunter-gatherers who roamed this land in search of sustenance and water. Their engravings most commonly (though not always) depict animals such as eland, quagga or elephant, and reflect, in fascinating and unusual ways, the relationship of the San to the harsh environment of the Karoo. San Rock Engravings explores the visual legacy of these ancient artists, the signs they left on the land and the meanings that could be attached to them.
    Author Biography Neil Rusch is an independent publisher, writer and photographer. After studying journalism at Rhodes University, he entered publishing and later became the editor of SA Yachting magazine. His interest in rock art has remained constant throughout his career, and he acknowledges that the /Xam San have taught him much about rain, weather, wind and water. John Parkington is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Cape Town, and has had a lifelong research interest in southern African hunters and gatherers. He has published a number of academic papers and books on the subject and is involved in the Living Landscape Project in Clanwilliam.